These are some the models I think of when reflecting upon my own engagement, within and without. My processing of experiences brings to mind the ways in which we learn, even in utero. As we encounter the new, and then the familiar, we differentiate and associate, questing for some degree of order. We contrast and compare. We look to identify the same, and clap with glee in celebration of the unexpected. With wonder, curiosity, excitement and some trepidation we plunge through our mysterious jungle.

Hopefully, these same emotions accompany us throughout our life, and, if we have well shared, they may continue beyond us. My “There And Back Again” reflects an extended span of my life. The laser etched images are recollections from an earlier exploration of art. The holograms, and the technology used to create the piece itself, are from a very recent time, when I returned to The Ohio State University to complete my Bachelor of Fine Arts. Interestingly, I had a fascination with holograms at the earlier time but did not find a way to pursue making them. Holography is currently a very widely used term but it is almost universally bandied around in error. It is not iridescent clothing or makeup. It is not HoloLenses, Tupac apparitions or conferences.

Real holography, not Pepper’s ghost projections, captures light waves as they bend and provides a true perspective with parallax of the subject. For me, it is a vehicle through which I explore the past and present and share and engage with others. After discovering how much work has been done with holography in the past I firmly believe that we are now due for a resurgence of true holography. All it takes is for more people to make and display holograms, so that multitudes can be thrilled with these marvels of light.